Category: #KnowYourRights

There is no excuse, Speak out against Sexual abuse – Lets KnowYourRights

“I’m writing this blog post to support Amnesty International’s#KnowYourRights campaign at BlogAdda. You can also contribute to the cause by donating or spreading the word.”

The consequences of sexual violence may carry over generations, influencing the development and progress of individuals, families, communities, societies and countries over time. Sexual violence affects all societies worldwide. It is a major public health problem and although it is increasingly being recognized as a human rights violation, prevention and services for survivors remain inadequate.  sexual violence is defined as “any sexual act, attempt to obtain a sexual act, unwanted sexual comments or advances, or acts to traffic, or otherwise directed, against a person’s sexuality using coercion”.  Rape culture refers neither to physical locations where rape is deemed likely to occur, does occur and/or has occurred, nor to the specific details of particular rapes: rather, it refers to a culture – that is, a set of values, beliefs, rituals, social codes, language, laws and art – which can be said to promote sexual violence, and particularly sexual violence against women as perpetrated by straight men. I believe that girls experience multiple and intersecting forms of violence.  Sexual violence is a serious problem that can have lasting, harmful effects on victims and their family, friends, and communities. Explaining sexual violence against women is complicated by the multiple forms it takes and contexts in which it occurs. There is considerable overlap between forms of sexual violence and intimate partner violence; many of the causes are similar to those already discussed in Article. There are factors increasing the risk of someone being coerced into sex, factors increasing the risk of an individual man forcing sex on another person, and factors within the social environment – including peers and family – influencing the likelihood of rape and the reaction to it. Research suggests that the various factors have an additive effect, so that the more factors present, the greater the likelihood of sexual violence.

<a class=”embedly-card” href=”https://www.youtube.com/embed/X6qnu5TfSwE”>Know Your Rights : Increase reporting of sexual violence</a>
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 The goal of sexual violence prevention is simple—to stop it from happening in the first place. We need to look at the complexities of the ways in which girls and young women experience abuse in order to adequately comprehend the context in which gender-based violence exists. Reporting on sexual violence demands special care and increased ethical sensitivity. It requires specialized interviewing skills, understanding of the law, and basic awareness about the psychological impact of trauma. It is well known that feelings of shame, guilt and fear might lead someone to not report being a victim of sexual assault.  If the person somehow finds the courage to report even while experiencing such devastating feelings, it is important that the process be one that is both encouraging and  affirming. We are unable to quantify or characterize those who do not come forward, nor are we able to assess how the process would unfold  even if they wanted to do so. By definition, it is extremely difficult to assess the extent of a problem that people refuse to report,  although professional assessments support the existence of unreported cases of adolescent sexual assault. Many people associate it with physical violence. But sexual violence can also include pornography, Internet abuse, sexual harassment, and other forms of harm that may not necessarily result in physical injury. The offender may use threats or coercive behavior. Prevention efforts should ultimately decrease the number of individuals who perpetrate sexual violence and the number of individuals who are sexual violence victims. Many prevention approaches aim to reduce risk factors and promote protective factors for sexual violence. In addition, comprehensive prevention strategies should address factors at each of the levels that influence sexual violence— individual, relationship, community, and society. Public education focusing on rape awareness assisted victims by highlighting the perpetrator’s behavior and not the behavior of the victim. The movement in supporting victims of sexual victimization was also strengthened by legal reform to extend the definitions of rape and sexual assault. In most states, sexual  victimization laws are now gender and relationship neutral. Despite changes in public attitudes and legal reform, victims still face obstacles in coming forward to report crimes of sexual victimization. Primary prevention of sexual violence can save both lives and money . Policies and guidelines on how best to prevent sexual violence from occurring should therefore form a key part of national government gender violence programmes. The extent to which countries have policies on rape prevention is unknown. Moreover, evidence on what works in the area of prevention and sexual violence is limited, particularly in developing countries. Policies and guidelines on how best to prevent sexual violence should form a key part of national government gender violence programmes. The extent to which countries have policies on rape prevention is unknown. Moreover, evidence on what works in the area of prevention and sexual violence is limited, particularly in developing countries. To prevent sexual violence, an understanding of risk factors and what a comprehensive response entails is needed. There is no argument about the pervasiveness and impact of sexual violence. The challenge we face is how to prevent it. Over the last 15 years, Indian governments have developed comprehensive multi-level strategies to try and address the needs of victims, to hold perpetrators responsible and to educate the community about how to prevent sexual and other forms of intimate violence. Over this time, it has become clear that the prevention of sexual assault is a complex task that challenges policy makers, victim and perpetrator services, educators, researchers and the communities in which we live.  Many studies have shown that sexual offences cost billions of dollars, making them among the most expensive interpersonal crimes in the world, especially considering their high prevalence and factors such as medical costs, loss of earnings, and loss of quality of life. We also need to continue to work more effectively to hold perpetrators of sexual violence accountable. Our current understandings recognize the need for multi-sector and diverse responses if we are to move more closely to preventing sexual violence. Prevention education is one crucial strategy in government and community responses to sexual violence.  It is hoped that the findings of this Article will support international advocacy efforts to include rape prevention, along with comprehensive quality care to rape survivors, in national gender violence policies and strategies globally.

In my way the Education as a primary prevention strategy. It is important to consider what we know about the theoretical development of ideas surrounding the most effective prevention education activities. Healthy relationships- The moral imperative here implies that if young people understand the predetermined characteristics of a healthy relationship this will result in them governing themselves and being better homoerotic citizens. Sexuality education and violence prevention- Another area of increasing interest in the field is the integration of sexuality education and sexual assault prevention education. Traditionally these areas of work have developed separately and often been delivered by different groups of professionals.

Forms and contexts of sexual violence

A wide range of sexually violent acts can take place in different circumstances and settings. These include:

Rape within marriage or dating relationships;

 Rape by strangers;

 Systematic rape during armed conflict;

Unwanted sexual advances or sexual harassment, including demanding sex in return for favors;

Sexual abuse of mentally or physically disabled people;

Sexual abuse of children;

Forced marriage or cohabitation, including the marriage of children;

 Denial of the right to use contraception or to adopt other measures to protect against  sexually transmitted diseases;


“I’m writing this blog post to support Amnesty International’s#KnowYourRights campaign at BlogAdda. You can also contribute to the cause by donating or spreading the word.”